Mobile Technology for Improving Quality of Education in India

In my previous blog, i mentioned that technology should not be the focus of India’s educational strategy. Having said that, i think technology can play an important role in addressing the educational issues, if used the right way. With over 850 million mobile phone subscribers in India, we need to leverage this enormous power and potential of mobile technology for making a positive impact in the education sector. Continue reading

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Top 3 Things India Needs To Do For Improving Quality Of Basic Education

I just spent the past 3 months in India looking at the education system and how ICT could play a role in improving student outcomes. After countless discussions with local scholars, school visits, teacher interviews, and conversations with students and parents (both in rural and urban India), I’ve come to the conclusion that lack of technology is not the reason for the abysmal quality of basic education in India. Continue reading

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Basic Education in India – Lack of Teacher Accountability, NOT Technology, is the Real Issue.

I was fortunate to get a research fellowship from Georgetown University this summer to go to India and learn/discuss some of the educational issues in India. I just got back from my 3-month stint, and i wanted to share the things i learnt in India. Continue reading

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Need to Make “Teaching” A Valuable Profession in India!

 

There has been a lot of talk lately on the use of technology replacing teachers in schools. Although all this sounds very “cool”, “hi-tech”, and revolutionary 21st century thinking, we should not lose sight of the importance of “human teachers”. Evidence has clearly shown that just blindly introducing technology in schools has no positive impact on student outcomes, and is NOT a replacement for good teaching. The biggest bottleneck for quality of education in primary and secondary schools is the sustained motivation of students. And supervision from human teachers and parents is the only way to generate that motivation. The most important influence on the child’s learning is the school teacher. Teacher motivation and performance is a key ingredient to a healthy and productive learning environment. Continue reading

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Basic Education in India – A Quick Summary of Thoughts

The challenges in the Indian education system are enormous, and there are no simple answers! Educational issues are very complicated here – lots of reasons for that – some social, some cultural, some political and some economic. And frankly i think India itself is a very complicated place.  I just wanted to jot down a short/quick summary of my initial thoughts on the Indian education system based on what I’ve learnt here the past 5-6 weeks:
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Pre-School Education Anyone??

 

Based on research on the human brain, it is globally acknowledged that the first 6-8 years of a child’s life are the most critical years for lifelong development. The research also indicates that if these early years are not supported by a stimulating and enriching physical, mental and social environment, the chances of child’s brain developing to its full potential are considerably reduced, sometimes irreversibly. Hence the importance of early childhood education, or “Pre-school” Education. Continue reading

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Improving Teacher Accountability is the Key for a Better Quality of Education in India

It is well documented that the quality of basic public education in India is pathetic! The latest ASER report 2010 clearly shows that. And the newly passed Right to Education (RTE) Act has made things worse by neglecting this very fact, and focusing mainly on the inputs to the education system – school infrastructural needs, student enrollment rates, mid-day meals etc. Continue reading

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